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Articulation Therapy

Articulation Therapy, Language Therapy, Little Friends, Toy Reviews and Uses

How to Create and Use Surprise Eggs for an Instant and Engaging Speech Therapy Activity

Photo Sep 17, 8 26 53 PM

 

One of the first toys I put together as a clinical fellow (a copy of something my incredible coworker owns) was a set of surprise eggs. I am not exaggerating when I say the day these little eggs came into my life, my job got easier and my world got happier. I’m talking critter clinic and ball popper levels of GOODNESS here, people. It is instant-therapy and so engaging!

I’m going to walk you through why they are so wonderful to have on-hand, tips on putting together your own set, and how I like to use them. I promise to be brief- we’ve all got stuff to do.

 

WHY THEY ARE AWESOME

Each egg is its own mini activity with a clear beginning and end- which I LOVE. It is enormously helpful for keeping little people’s attention because you can move through it quickly. It also helps reduce behaviors because they soon learn the expectation that the toy is here, and then it’s gone, then another one comes, and that’s just how it is. Even the simple visual of each egg going into an “all done bin” one at a time can be helpful.

Surprise eggs also lend themselves SO EASILY to creating verbal routines (my favorites are below in the “How I Use Them” section). They can also be easily adapted as an activity for infants and preschoolers alike. I have even had some older kids show interest! Depending on what you fill them with, you can use these for just about anyone. Personally, I never change out the objects inside because it would just take too much time, but that would absolutely be an option to adapt them to different goals and age groups.

 

HOW TO MAKE YOUR OWN

Word to the wise- invest in quality eggs. I purchased my first set from Target around Easter time and they have held up beautifully! When I needed more, I tried to find some cheap ones on Amazon- half of them were cracked and the other half didn’t close properly. Don’t do it! Spend the big bucks.

You can fill the eggs with  just about anything! My favorites are wind-ups and other interactive toys you can find at places like Michaels and Party City. Things that light up, bounce, spin, and squish are perfect for providing plenty of language opportunities!

I also store them in a clear tub that latches so it easy for children to request what color they would like next without making it to easy for it to be a free-for-all. I store most of my toys this way.

 

HOW I USE THEM IN THERAPY

  • Verbal Routines: knock knock knock open, shake shake shake open, telling the toys hi/bye as you take them out/in, and (of course) READY SET GO!!
  • Wh Questions – what is it, what is it doing, what color do you want
  • SO MANY VERBS AND ADJECTIVES AND NOUNS!
  • -Gross Motor Imitation- knocking on the egg, shaking the egg, waving hi/bye to the toys
  • -Functional Play- do we know how to make the tiny car drive? or the little dinosaur eat your hair? (weird, but fun)
  • Joint Attention- optimal opportunities for eye contact and social referencing!
  • Bonus OT Tip- a 2 year old child should be able to open these eggs- if not, a referral is warranted!

 

I am so excited for you to try this activity! I truly have used it almost every day since I made my first set during my CFY years ago. If you make your own- tag me in your picture so I can see! I love hearing from you!

Have FUN, Speechy People!

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Articulation Therapy, Feeding

Whole-Child Speech Therapy for Treating Frontal Lisps

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We can talk about “hiding our tongue” and keeping “tight teeth” ’til we’re blue in the face… but for some kiddos it seems that pesky frontal lisp just WILL. NOT. GENERALIZE. into a crisp, beautiful /s/. Why? Because the way the tongue of many frontal lispers moves is different and, to be honest, disordered all day every day. Often times, they have an immature swallow pattern. If you watch them eat, you will see that little tongue peep out more than it should.

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We see a huge correlation between frontal lisps and kiddos who have (or had) prolonged usage of sippy cups, pacifiers, and thumb-sucking. Their swallowing pattern got stuck a little too close to the suckle stage and they continue to use a tongue-thrust pattern to swallow. We swallow about 600 times a day. That means every time our kiddos clear their saliva they are reinforcing their frontal lisp.
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Furthermore, you will notice our kiddos have a low at-rest posture for their tongue. I like to joke that my superpower is being able to identify people who used to have a lisp just by watching them speak for a few seconds. Lispers tongues hang low in their mouth – you can check out what I mean by watching THIS video.

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SO WHAT CAN WE DO ABOUT IT?

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Before I start articulation therapy with any of my frontal lispers… we do a few things.

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1. Nose Breathing

Ensure that your kiddo is a nose breather. Perform an oral mech and check for enlarged tonsils. Ask about seasonal allergies. Refer accordingly. Mouth-breathing promotes a low, forward resting posture of the tongue.

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2. No more sippy cups

Or thumb sucking. Or pacifiers. Or finger sucking. Cup drinking and straw drinking only, please.

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3. Make sure their tongue tip can elevate to their alveolar ridge.

Some kiddos just haven’t figured this out yet. If you need some help getting tongue-jaw dissociation, take the jaw out of the equation by having them bite down on something that well help prop open their mouth. (My favorite is to stack a few popsicle sticks and tape the together. It’s cheap and easy to replicate at home.) This will stabilize their jaw and allow them to put all their focus on getting that tongue in position. You can always add a tactile cue by putting some sour spray or ice cream on their alveolar ridge. I find kiddos don’t need these cues for very long once they figure out where their tongue should be. We need to be able to elevate our tongue tip to swallow properly, to produce appropriate alveolar phonemes, and even to get a good clear /s/.

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4. Tongue checks.

Have the kiddo engage in a silent activity- be it iPad time, coloring, building blocks, or anything in between. Periodically do a “tongue check” to see that they are keeping their tongue tip elevated to their alveolar ridge. We are trying to change the resting posture of their tongue here. For a tongue check freebie, click here.

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5. Feeding therapy.

If you watch a frontal lisper eat, you will likely see that tongue sneak out during or after their swallow on most food consistencies (liquid, puree, crunchy, etc). They will tell you they are just licking their lips- nope. Target a mature swallow in feeding therapy- and consider referring out if you are not trained in feeding. Again, we swallow 600 times each day!

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6. Look beyond the /s/

Watch their tongue on all alveolar sounds. There is an awfully good chance that if they are lisping on /s,z/ sh, ch, j… that /t,d,n.l/ aren’t correct either. Watch close and remember to follow a developmental pattern when targeting phonemes.

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7. Consider an appliance.

If you are signed up for our newsletter then you have already heard about these awesome appliances. Think of it as a tiny speech therapist in their mouth 24/7. The idea is that they receive speech and feeding therapy to learn how to place their tongue at the alveolar ridge for their swallow and for all alveolar sounds. This little bead serves as a warning that their tongue is going too far forward.

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And there ya go!
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Just some food for thought, friends. There may be so much more going on than just that pesky /s/ sound. We want to be sure to treat the whole child and hopefully this post will shine some light on your students. Once  you’ve addressed these concerns, you’ll be ready to kick some articulation booty and get them cookin’ with some drill work and generalization activities. Have fun, speechy friends! Conquer the frontal lisp!

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(puppy photo credit: Marion Michele via unsplash.com)

 

Articulation Therapy

Using Personal Photos to Make Speech Therapy Functional

Photo Sep 10, 9 06 07 PM

One of my favorite things to do as an SLP is brainstorm with families on how to improve their child’s and their family’s daily lives. I am a firm believer that an effective communicator is a confident communicator and that confident people are nicer and make the world a better place.

(So really… we’re saving the world  here, folks.)

Speech therapy is great and sure I want you to know how to say “poP” with a strong tail sound…

but what I really want is for that little person to be able to function beautifully in their environment. (Or at least to the best of their ability.)

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A goal I typically target early is a list of functional words provided by the family. I ask them to brainstorm at least 10 words that their kiddo might use on a daily basis, preferably high motivators. This may include family names, pet names, favorite foods, beloved toys, and anything else that is important to that particular child or that particular family.

If it’s important to them, it’s important to me.

I try to have the family bring in photos representing these words so they can serve as their child’s own set of personal flash cards.

I’ve used this for all sorts of ages, diagnoses, and levels of intelligibility. I find it especially important for kiddos who have phonological processes or other diagnoses that severely impact their intelligibility.

I just think to myself…

What can I start doing TODAY that could change this child’s life?

It may be being able to pronounce his own name when asked. It may be clearly stating “potty” when he needs the restroom at school. Anything functional is fair game.

It’s such a simple idea (and one I credit my CF supervisor for giving me) but it’s one I’ve used with just about every kiddo with severely impacted intelligibility that has come through my therapy room.

Do you already do this with your kiddos? I’d love to hear your thoughts and additions to this concept!

Go Team!
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