Browsing Category

Articulation Therapy

Articulation Therapy, Feeding

Frontal Lisps

Slide08.png

We can talk about “hiding our tongue” and keeping “tight teeth” ’til we’re blue in the face… but for some kiddos it seems that pesky frontal lisp just WILL. NOT. GENERALIZE. into a crisp, beautiful /s/. Why? Because the way the tongue of many frontal lispers moves is different and, to be honest, disordered all day every day. Often times, they have an immature swallow pattern. If you watch them eat, you will see that little tongue peep out more than it should.

.

We see a huge correlation between frontal lisps and kiddos who have (or had) prolonged usage of sippy cups, pacifiers, and thumb-sucking. Their swallowing pattern got stuck a little too close to the suckle stage and they continue to use a tongue-thrust pattern to swallow. We swallow about 600 times a day. That means every time our kiddos clear their saliva they are reinforcing their frontal lisp.
.
Furthermore, you will notice our kiddos have a low at-rest posture for their tongue. I like to joke that my superpower is being able to identify people who used to have a lisp just by watching them speak for a few seconds. Lispers tongues hang low in their mouth – you can check out what I mean by watching THIS video.

.

SO WHAT CAN WE DO ABOUT IT?

.
Before I start articulation therapy with any of my frontal lispers… we do a few things.

.
1. Nose Breathing

Ensure that your kiddo is a nose breather. Perform an oral mech and check for enlarged tonsils. Ask about seasonal allergies. Refer accordingly. Mouth-breathing promotes a low, forward resting posture of the tongue.

.
2. No more sippy cups

Or thumb sucking. Or pacifiers. Or finger sucking. Cup drinking and straw drinking only, please.

.
3. Make sure their tongue tip can elevate to their alveolar ridge.

Some kiddos just haven’t figured this out yet. If you need some help getting tongue-jaw dissociation, take the jaw out of the equation by having them bite down on something that well help prop open their mouth. (My favorite is to stack a few popsicle sticks and tape the together. It’s cheap and easy to replicate at home.) This will stabilize their jaw and allow them to put all their focus on getting that tongue in position. You can always add a tactile cue by putting some sour spray or ice cream on their alveolar ridge. I find kiddos don’t need these cues for very long once they figure out where their tongue should be. We need to be able to elevate our tongue tip to swallow properly, to produce appropriate alveolar phonemes, and even to get a good clear /s/.

.
4. Tongue checks.

Have the kiddo engage in a silent activity- be it iPad time, coloring, building blocks, or anything in between. Periodically do a “tongue check” to see that they are keeping their tongue tip elevated to their alveolar ridge. We are trying to change the resting posture of their tongue here. For a tongue check freebie, click here.

.
5. Feeding therapy.

If you watch a frontal lisper eat, you will likely see that tongue sneak out during or after their swallow on most food consistencies (liquid, puree, crunchy, etc). They will tell you they are just licking their lips- nope. Target a mature swallow in feeding therapy- and consider referring out if you are not trained in feeding. Again, we swallow 600 times each day!

.
6. Look beyond the /s/

Watch their tongue on all alveolar sounds. There is an awfully good chance that if they are lisping on /s,z/ sh, ch, j… that /t,d,n.l/ aren’t correct either. Watch close and remember to follow a developmental pattern when targeting phonemes.

.
7. Consider an appliance.

If you are signed up for our newsletter then you have already heard about these awesome appliances. Think of it as a tiny speech therapist in their mouth 24/7. The idea is that they receive speech and feeding therapy to learn how to place their tongue at the alveolar ridge for their swallow and for all alveolar sounds. This little bead serves as a warning that their tongue is going too far forward.

.

And there ya go!
.

Just some food for thought, friends. There may be so much more going on than just that pesky /s/ sound. We want to be sure to treat the whole child and hopefully this post will shine some light on your students. Once  you’ve addressed these concerns, you’ll be ready to kick some articulation booty and get them cookin’ with some drill work and generalization activities. Have fun, speechy friends! Conquer the frontal lisp!

-Lindsey

(puppy photo credit: Marion Michele via unsplash.com)

 

Articulation Therapy

Making Speech Personal

personalfunctional.png
Photo by Lindy Baker on Unsplash

One of my favorite things to do as an SLP is brainstorm with families on how to improve their child’s and their family’s daily lives. I am a firm believer that an effective communicator is a confident communicator and that confident people are nicer and make the world a better place.

(So really… we’re saving the world  here, folks.)

Speech therapy is great and sure I want you to know how to say “poP” with a strong tail sound…

but what I really want is for that little person to be able to function beautifully in their environment. (Or at least to the best of their ability.)

.

A goal I typically target early is a list of functional words provided by the family. I ask them to brainstorm at least 10 words that their kiddo might use on a daily basis, preferably high motivators. This may include family names, pet names, favorite foods, beloved toys, and anything else that is important to that particular child or that particular family.

If it’s important to them, it’s important to me.

I try to have the family bring in photos representing these words so they can serve as their child’s own set of personal flash cards.

I’ve used this for all sorts of ages, diagnoses, and levels of intelligibility. I find it especially important for kiddos who have phonological processes or other diagnoses that severely impact their intelligibility.

I just think to myself…

What can I start doing TODAY that could change this child’s life?

It may be being able to pronounce his own name when asked. It may be clearly stating “potty” when he needs the restroom at school. Anything functional is fair game.

It’s such a simple idea (and one I credit my CF supervisor for giving me) but it’s one I’ve used with just about every kiddo with severely impacted intelligibility that has come through my therapy room.

Do you already do this with your kiddos? I’d love to hear your thoughts and additions to this concept!

Go Team!
Lindsey

Articulation Therapy, For Parents, Little Friends

Mirror Neuron: The Science of Sight in Speech

mirrorneuron.jpg

“Look at me.”

“Watch my mouth.”

“Eyes, please.”

 

How many times a day do you say this? Is it one or two million?

It’s a large number to be sure, but let’s talk about the science behind why.
The why is SO important in our field- both to us, and to our families. The why is what keeps us on track with evidence-based practice. The why is also what helps us get buy-in and home carryover.

.

Enter: The Mirror Neuron

When people watch an action being performed, their brain begins to process it as though they were performing the action themselves. Let’s break it down.

Person 1: picks up a glass of water, “zone 1” of their brain lights up
Person 2: watches person 1 pick up a glass of water, “zone 1” of their brain also lights up

Person 2: throws a ball, “zone 2” of their brain lights up
Person 1: watches person 2 throw a ball, “zone 2” of their brain lights up

.

It. is. SO. COOL.

This applies directly to our therapy. When your kiddo watches your mouth produce a proper /f/, or watches your tongue lateralize while chewing, or watches your hands sign “car”… their little brains begin to light up as though they were performing the action themselves.
.

It’s that simple! Seeing is doing. (kinda)

Tell your colleagues. Tell your parents. Tell your mama. Get those eyeballs on you when teaching a skill – whether it’s related to speech, language, or feeding. If they are watching, they are (fingers crossed) attending and therefore learning.

Besides, throwing out cool terms like “mirror neuron” will not only educate… it will impress. You can even direct them to this article on the American Psychological Association’s (APA) website.

.

P.S. If you would like an easy FREE handout to give parents of late talkers that emphasizes the importance of children watching our mouths when modeling words, as well as strategies to achieve their attention, click here.

 

Yay, science!
Lindsey